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Adding Latin Flair: 2016 Mazda2 Production Begins in Mexico

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2014 Mazda2 Touring 6MT True Red (4) 2016 Mazda2 Production

Nationwide excitement for the 2016 Mazda2 is already growing thanks to its recent nab of Japan’s Car of the Year Award (in the form of the identical Mazda Demio). So, it’s about time that the brand began increasing 2016 Mazda2 production to deliver on the hype it’s building for next year’s release.

Related: Getting ready for the mystical diesel-electric vehicle on the way

2016 Mazda2 Production Is the First Step Toward Another Strong Year for Mazda

Mazda has started taking steps toward getting the new Mazda2 model ready for US release! Ever since its much-hyped unveiling earlier this year and those stunning photos in July, we’ve wanted to get our butts in the driver’s seat of the fresh subcompact car.

The Japanese automaker is taking advantage of its new Mazda de Mexico Vehicle Operation (MMVO) plant in Mexico to deliver on scheduled 2016 Mazda2 production. Two other facilities are already involved in 2016 Mazda2 production: Hofu Plant in Japan and Auto Alliance in Thailand. But that wasn’t enough. 2016 Mazda2 production needed some Latin flair!

Taco Dance

The automaker hasn’t wasted any time beginning production at MMVO, either. The facility’s engine machining plant began operating on October 21st after a year of construction. Not a couple days into production, Mazda is already planning on increasing the Mexican facility’s capacity by 250,000 annual units by the end of 2016.

That’s not a big surprise considering the success of Mazda’s SKYACTIV products and the growing popularity of the brand around the world.

“With the start of production of the all-new Mazda2, operations underway at the engine machining plant, and an increase in our annual production capacity, we now have an even stronger production framework capable of supplying global markets with SKYACTIV products of the same high quality level as those made in Japan,” said MMVO President Keishi Egawa. “At the same time, we are pleased to be able to make a contribution to Mexico’s further economic growth.”

Who knows–perhaps the Mazda2s built at MMVO’s horn will sound like a mariachi band!

Related: Taking a look at what the Mazda3 has to offer