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Best Road Trip Movies: Dumb and Dumber Review

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Dumb and Dumber is the first adult comedy movie I remember seeing as a little kid, and it is still one of my absolute favorites. In fact, I was incredibly excited when I heard they were making a sequel, but then I saw the trailer and let’s just not talk about that ever please. (We also won’t be discussing the prequel, Dumb and Dumberer, for similar reasons.)

Dumb and Dumber Review

Harry and Lloyd of Dumb and Dumber
New Line Cinema/YouTube

The original, however, is genius—the ultimate buddy comedy. That’s why it earned a spot on our best road trip movies list, so without further ado, I give you my Dumb and Dumber review. Let’s put another shrimp on the barbie, eh?

The Plot

Harry and Lloyd are two rather simple fellas, so the plot that follows is just as simple. The two idiotic roommates (like, Peter Griffin meets Patrick Star kind of idiotic), Harry, played by Jeff Daniels, and Lloyd, played by Jim Carrey, both lose their jobs in one day. On the last day of his job, however, Lloyd, who had been a limo driver, falls in love with a passenger on the way to the airport, who leaves a briefcase inside the airport before boarding her plane. Lloyd quickly grabs the briefcase with the intention of returning it.

Dumb and Dumber Review

Harry and Lloyd on the road to Aspen
New Line Cinema/YouTube

It turns out, however, that the passenger, Mary, had been leaving the briefcase full of money to pay off a kidnapper who had abducted her husband, getting Lloyd and Harry mixed up into all sorts of trouble as they travel across the country to Aspen in a giant box van decorated like a shaggy dog to deliver Mary her seemingly lost briefcase.

The Cars

A few key vehicles are used throughout the film. The most important vehicle, of course, is Harry’s 1984 Ford Econoline that has been transformed into a rolling pet grooming station, decked out as what Lloyd calls a “shaggin’ wagon.”

Dumb and Dumber Review

The Mutt Cutts Ford Econoline
New Line Cinema/YouTube

Also included in the cast of cars is Lloyd’s 1987 Cadillac Brougham Stretched Limo, which he crashes near the beginning of the film.

You’d think that the most hilarious vehicle on the film would be the Econoline-turned-dog, but you’d be mistaken. At some point in the film, Lloyd trades the Econoline for a Harley-Davidson FXRT Sport Glide, which is not only a poor trade, but also a terrible vehicle on which to carry two grown men through the slopes of the Rockies.

Dumb and Dumber Review

Harry and Lloyd atop the Harley-Davidson FXRT Sport Glide
New Line Cinema/YouTube

Late in the film, Harry and Lloyd discover the money in Mary’s briefcase and decide to use it (replacing it with I.O.U.s) until they can find her. Their big purchase is a sexy, red Lamborghini Diablo.

Dumb and Dumber Review

Dumb and Dumber is great for a number of reasons. The classic comedy is of course great for laughs over and over again, and it tells a very simple story in an incredibly entertaining way. It mixes humor and romance and even adds some thrills in near the end.

Dumb and Dumber Review

Harry and Lloyd just doing what all best friends do
New Line Cinema/YouTube

But most importantly, it is a true “bro” bonding movie that highlights the importance of friendship. Harry and Lloyd have a lot to run from back home, and a lot to run to in Aspen, but what viewers come to realize is that, wherever they are, as long as they are together, they are okay. As cheesy as that sounds, their journey together solidifies their friendship. While they may be entirely too stupid to recognize this consciously, they have been brought closer by the trip with one another. Despite everything else they might lose, they have that friendship. And I think that’s pretty neat.

I definitely recommend this movie to everyone. Please, go watch it now.

  • Timothy MooreContributing Writer

    Timothy Moore takes his leadership inspiration from Michael Scott, his writing inspiration from Mark Twain, and his dancing inspiration from every drunk white guy at a wedding. When Tim is not writing about cars, he’s working on his novel or reading someone else’s, geeking out over strategy board games, hiking with his pooch, or channeling his inner Linda Belcher over beers with his friends. See more articles by Timothy.