Patrick Grieve
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Chevy’s LEGO Batmobile Gets Critiqued By “Real LEGO Minifigures, Not Actors”

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Chevy commercial featuring "Real LEGO Minifigures, Not Actors" to promote Chevrolet LEGO Batmobile and The LEGO Batman Movie

Okay, Chevy is officially just screwing with us right now.

Shortly after parodying its own (highly suspect) “Real People, Not Actors” advertising campaign with a Cruze Hatchback ad featuring “Real Dogs, Not Actors,” the bowtie brand is going one step further, with a computer-animated commercial starring “Real LEGO Minifigures, Not Actors.”

Very cute, Chevy. Very cute.


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I probably don’t need to tell you this, but, these people are actors. All of them! Especially Batman, who is voiced by actual-famous-actor Will Arnett!

The Batmobile itself, however, really is real.

Though it’s sadly not for sale, Chevy actually did build a life-size LEGO Batmobile, which debuted this past weekend at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. The17-foot long, 1,695.5-lb comic book car is composed of 344,187 LEGO bricks, which builders spent 1,833 hours assembling at the LEGO Model Shop in Enfield, Connecticut.

Its all part of Chevy’s partnership with Warner Bros to promote The LEGO Batman Movie, which stars the aforementioned Will Arnett, along with Zach Galifianakis, Michael Cera, Rosario Dawson, and Ralph Fiennes. The computer-animated film is set to hit theaters on February 10, 2017.

Even the GM Renaissance center in downtown Detroit got in on the act, flashing the Bat signal on its tower, before alternating back to the Chevy bowtie logo:


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GM should be cautious about flashing that iconic Gotham symbol, though. If they’re not careful, someone is going to confuse Detroit with a dystopian city consumed by crime and urban blight.

  • Patrick GrieveContributor

    Patrick Grieve was born in Southwestern Ohio and has lived there all of his life, with the exception of a few years spent getting a Creative Writing degree in Southeastern Ohio. He loves to take road trips, sometimes to places as distant as Northeastern or even Northwestern Ohio. Patrick also enjoys old movies, shopping at thrift stores, going to ballgames, writing about those things, and watching Law & Order reruns. He just watches the original series, though, none of the spin-offs. And also only the ones they made before Jerry Orbach died. Season five was really the peak, in his opinion. See more articles by Patrick.