Timothy Moore
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Chrysler Ignition Switches Now Under Investigation

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Because why should GM have all the fun?

Just as Mary Barra testified yet again at a U.S. House hearing about the GM ignition switch recall, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) announced that there might be a similar issue with Chrysler ignition switches. Officially, NHTSA is opening two separate probes into potential defects in Chrysler ignition switches. In total, the administration will look into about 1.25 million vehicles from Chrysler Group.

Chrysler Ignition Switches | 2010 Chrysler Town & Country Limited

A 2010 Chrysler Town & Country minivan, one of the vehicles under investigation

According to NHTSA, these two investigations “are an outcome of NHTSA’s communication with automotive manufacturers and suppliers regarding airbag design and performance related to the position of the vehicle ignition switch.” Reportedly, Chrysler Group is prepared to “cooperate fully with the investigation,” but is currently waiting on more information from NHTSA.

NHTSA has received various complaints about these Chrysler ignition switches, which allegedly move from the “run” position to “accessory.” The administration is currently not “aware of any related incidents involving airbag non-deployments,” and no deaths or injuries have been linked to the potential defects in these Chrysler ignition switches.

The first probe is into about 525,000 Jeep Commanders (2006 – 2007) and Jeep Grand Cherokees (2005 – 2006). For these, a driver’s knee could bump the ignition and move it out of “run.” The second and larger probe deals with about 700,000 Dodge Journeys, Dodge Grand Caravans, and Chrysler Town and Country minivans from 2008 – 2010. In these, the spring in the ignition switch can possible pop the switch back beyond “run” and “accessory,” putting the vehicle in a dangerous position in which the engine can easily shut off.

You might be saying, “But wait, I drive a 2010 model that was already recalled for this issue, and it was fixed.” Welp, you’re SOL because that fix didn’t actually fix it, according to NHTSA. You’re going to have to go back and have it fixed again. Only hopefully this time, it works.

At this point, it sounds like no one is safe on the roads. So when do you think they’ll have that whole teleportation thing figured out? Because I’ve got a vacation planned for July and I’d like to get there in one piece. Please and thanks.

  • Timothy MooreManaging Editor

    Timothy Moore hails from Dayton, Ohio, and tries to bring that Midwestern flavor to his writing. (But as it turns out, no one really likes the Midwestern flavor.) He has been covering the auto industry for years, with several national auto shows under his belt, but he’s been writing about lots of other things (like dragons and Mickey Mouse and cows drowning in milk) since he was just a tot. Outside of the land of cars, Timothy enjoys watching The Office and consuming excessive amounts of peanut butter and beer, and is on the board of an up-and-coming Dayton theatre company called The Playground. And when he’s not on stage (or three jars into a peanut butter binge), Timothy spends time with his mischievous dog, Greyson. See more articles by Timothy.