The News Wheel
2 Comments

First Chevy Tahoe PPVs Go to County of Ventura

Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size Text Size Print This Page
First Chevy Tahoe PPVs Go to County of Ventura

First Chevy Tahoe PPVs Go to County of Ventura
©GM

The very first Chevy Tahoe PPVs have been delivered to the county sheriff’s department in Ventura County in California. The department will add in 25 of these police vehicles by the end of the year and will add in more starting next year as its aging Ford Crown Victorias and Dodge Chargers are phased out.


Model Research: All-New Chevy Tahoe


“The safety and ergonomics of the 2015 Chevrolet Tahoe PPV are the key reasons for the sheriff’s department and our fleet operations team choosing this vehicle to replace their current patrol vehicles,” said Peter Bednar, the Fleet Operations manager for the County of Ventura. “The visibility from the vehicle allows deputies to better spot incidents and react faster.”

First Chevy Tahoe PPVs Go to County of Ventura

©GM

The Chevy Tahoe PPV is already gaining in popularity. More than 6,500 Tahoe PPVs have been ordered since March of this year. Part of the attraction likely stems from its four-wheel-drive capability, as the Chevy Tahoe police vehicle is the only full-size, body-on-frame truck-based model available.

First Chevy Tahoe PPVs Go to County of Ventura


©GM

In addition to the Chevy Tahoe PPV, Chevrolet offers a Chevy Caprice PPV, a Chevy Impala Limited Police sedan, and a Chevy Silverado 1500 Crew Cab Special Service Vehicle.


Model Research: All-New Chevy Impala


  • This is a painfully stupid choice. This is not where we need to be going. Police want big fat stupid luxury cars and make the same lame excuses the rest of us do for the same reasons others do: it is “safer” to destroy the environment. I need the extra room to carry my hormones around. The car is to compensate for other things that are smaller than average. Do your part in the very difficult and important job of saving the planet, and drive a logical car.

  • Aaron

    @billchristian2013: yeah, definitely not the best choice for primary enforcement because of its image, although I think it makes a great supplemental patrol vehicle…in spite of its size and appearance, it does have some nice things about it: it’s engine uses cylinder-deactivation which shuts off half of the cylinders when full power is not being used (such as when cruising) along with direct-injection and variable-valve timing to make more power while reducing fuel consumption and emissions, it also uses power-electric steering so that the engine won’t need to work more to keep steering fluids warm, and it also has an auxiliary battery (along with the vehicle) that is dedicated to powering all the electrical emergency equipment (that way the engine can be shut-off, saving gas, emissions, and wear and tear on the engine)…but it would be better if they could get a newer sedan, like the Charger or Taurus.