Kyle Johnson
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Ford Recalls 435,000 Models For Issues With Frame Rust, Faulty Seats

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2014 Ford Escape Overview

The 2014 Escape is one of several models being recalled by Ford on Monday.

According to Dallas News, Ford will be recalling 435,000 cars in order to fix rusting frame parts or faulty seats.

The first of two Ford recalls issued Monday affects 386,000 Ford Escape vehicles from the 2001-2004 model years. According to the Associated Press, potential rusting in the subframes could lead a control arm to separate and interfere with steering. According to Ford, the issue has played a role in one clash that did not end with injuries.

USA Today notes that the recall is only for vehicles sold or registered in 20 cold-weather states, the District of Columbia, and seven Canadian provinces. The states involved, per The New York Times, are (in alphabetical order): Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. 379,000 of the affected Ford Escapes are in the United States, and 37,000 are in Canada.

The second recall affects 49,000 2013-2014 Ford Fusion, Escape, C-Max, and Lincoln MKZ models. The vehicles in question have improperly welded seat back frames; no accidents or incidents have been reported. Ford told NYT that the seats do not comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 207.

While the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has not yet issued recall notices, they will likely follow within the next few days. For more information, visit, or stay tuned to The News Wheel for the latest recall notices.

  • Kyle JohnsonEditor

    Kyle S. Johnson lives in Cincinnati, a city known by many as "the Cincinnati of Southwest Ohio." He enjoys professional wrestling, Halloween, and also other things. He has been writing for a while, and he plans to continue to write well into the future. See more articles by Kyle.