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Jeep Builds Wrangler Obstacle Course at Toledo Assembly Complex for Workers to Use

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The off-road obstacle course is designed to help factory workers receive a better understanding of the Jeep Wrangler's capabilities

2016 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Off Road Performance

Jeep is replicating the off-roading experience for factory workers on a smaller scale

Toledo, Ohio has always served as a home of sorts for Jeep, being the brand’s birthplace and what not. For generations, auto workers in the Ohio city have assembled some of the most iconic vehicles in the Jeep library, from the Cherokee to the Wrangler.

Still, while these workers may put Jeeps together, many of them do not own a Jeep themselves, so they’ve never experienced the off-roading capabilities of the Jeep lineup. Before production officially begins for the next generation of Wranglers, Jeep is setting out to change that.

To do so, Jeep has built an obstacle course outside its Toledo Assembly Complex for employees to use.


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It’s all part of Jeep’s plan to have workers familiarize themselves with the brand. The new program also includes training courses and a lesson on Jeep’s history, but the portion that workers are obviously most excited for is the obstacle course.

“We can certainly teach them about those features in a classroom or maybe with a video, but in the true spirit of Jeep — all about adventure and hands-on — we built the course, and they’re learning about those capabilities of the Wrangler by driving it themselves,” explained Jeep Plant Manager Chuck Padden.


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The course is actually comprised of two different trails. One is designed for drivers to rough it out on their own behind the wheel of a Wrangler, while the other, more difficult course has drivers accompanied by an off-roading expert.

A work crew spent three weeks building the course, utilizing 3,500 tons of dirt, rock, and asphalt. Still, higher-ups at Jeep consider the course to be an investment, and workers are evidently enjoying it as well.

Even with production on the “JL” Wrangler finally starting up, Jeep has not announced when or where it plans to reveal the vehicle. Still, thanks to this unusual assembly plant condition, at least workers will have a better understanding of the Wrangler’s abilities while assembling it.

News Sources: The Toledo Blade, Automotive News (subscription required)