Daniel Susco
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Keep Motion Sickness at Bay With This DIY Carsickness Prevention Kit

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As the weather warms up, the season of road trips will shortly be upon us once more, and in a roundabout sort of way, so will the season of carsickness. So, before you hit the road, put together a kit of the following items, and hopefully, combined with our tips on the subject, you can handily stave off motion sickness.


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Small bags of snacks

Sometimes, low-grade motion-sickness can be headed off by simply eating a small amount of some light carbohydrate—light, by the way, meaning without a lot of fat in it like some cheese crackers. Instead, try putting some crackers in bags, or find those small-portion snack bags for kids’ lunches.

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Ginger or Peppermint

A commonly-recommended cure for carsickness is ginger or peppermint, although the delivery method for these seems to vary widely, with some recommending putting peppermint essential oils on the inside of the wrist, some saying to have a lozenge or candy made with ginger or peppermint (although with the peppermint, apparently the menthol is the part you are really after), and some say to use doses of straight ginger extract. Others suggest you include freshly cut lemons in the prevention kit, including our own Kurt Verlin.

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Nausea medication

Dramamine and Benadryl are both medications available over the counter that reduce motion sickness, with the former coming in children-specific varieties (just make sure that your children are at least two years old – consult a doctor for advice). Keep in mind that these medications can cause drowsiness.

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Wrist bands

This item is a bit dubious. Basically, these are wrist bands that apply pressure on a spot on the inside of the wrist which is supposed to prevent nausea. However, these don’t seem to help everyone, so if they work for you, great! If not, then skip it.

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Interesting: What is the difference between a Used and a Certified Pre-Owned car?


This is part of a series of articles on sickness-readiness kits to keep in your car, ranging from light carsickness prevention supplies to a kit for traveling with a more serious illness. Click next article to see the article on the carsickness reaction kit.

News Sources: CuldeSacCool.comLifeasaMom.comKayleyann.comChildrensMD.orgPrevention

Daniel Susco is a native of the Dayton-Cincinnati area, and has written on a multitude of subjects. He can discuss Shakespeare, expound on Classical Mythology, and even make witty jokes about Pliny the Elder (More like “Pliny the Rounder,” right?). In his free time, Daniel enjoys reading, cooking, woodworking, and long walks on the beach (just kidding – sunburn is no joke). See more articles by Daniel.