Samuel Huist
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Update: Porsche and LaFerrari Street Racers Lied About Diplomatic Immunity

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It turns out the men who raced at dangerously high speeds through a Beverly Hills suburb–packed full of children–did not have diplomatic immunity, according to Jalopnik.

The problem is police still can’t arrest anyone because they can’t determine who was driving the vehicles, which is required to press charges under state law. Additionally, the house where the Qatari men parked their sports cars has been abandoned and authorities do not know if they are still in the Beverly Hills area.

Video: LaFerrari races Porsche 911 through Beverly Hills’ suburb

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Lt. Lincoln Hoshino of the Beverly Hills Police Department told Jalopnik that authorities know the identity of the man who owns both of the cars, but police will not make that information available to the public. Hoshino also made it clear the men do not have diplomatic immunity, which was confirmed by the US State Department. Hoshino also said if police would have been there to witness the illegal street race, then an arrest could have been made.

“The driving they’re involved in is atrocious,” Hoshino said. “They’re putting everyone’s lives in danger driving like that.”

Forbes has also reported that since Qatar does not have an embassy in Los Angeles– instead LA has a consulate–then it’s more likely the men would have been consulate officials, who have a lesser form of immunity than diplomatic officials. Consulate officials do not receive protection from criminal charges like reckless driving, unless it was required in order to perform their duties.

After the street race took place on September 12th, a video journalist who filmed part of the race, Jacob Rogers, allegedly confronted the Qatari men. Rogers claims he was then physically assaulted and that threats were made against his life.

Check back with The News Wheel to find out if any further updates are made to this story.

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News Sources: Jalopnik, Forbes

  • Samuel HuistEditor

    Samuel Huist is easily the tallest member (6-feet 5-inches) of the The News Wheel team. He enjoys listening to hip-hop music and loves watching NBA basketball. Sam is also a Dayton, Ohio native and doesn’t seem to mind that distinction as much anymore. His first car was a 1996 Ford Taurus he could barely fit in. Like many young folks, he seemed more concerned about the radio in his first car than actually doing the work to maintain an automobile, so sadly it’s no longer with us. See more articles by Samuel.