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Survey: Preposterous Amount of Young Drivers are Doing Stupid Things Behind the Wheel

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Distractions and Alcohol Pose Danger to Young Drivers: More 18-2

A survey commissioned by Ford Motor Company of Europe found that a startling number of European drivers aged 18-to-24 years old have engaged in one behind-the-wheel behavior or another that is associated with a higher frequency of road fatalities during the summer.

Coming Soon from Ford: 2017 Ford F-150 gets new EcoBoost engine, 10-speed automatic

According to the World Health Organization’s Global Status Report on Road Safety 2015, car crashes are the single leading cause of death for 18-to-24-year-olds, and that more of those crash-related fatalities occur during the summer than in any other time of the year.

In Europe, drivers from that same demographic account for 15% of all people killed in collisions and traffic accidents, despite only accounting for about 8% of the population. In the summer, 18-to-24-year-olds account for a startling 21% of all road deaths in Europe.

According to a report conducted by the European Road Safety Observatory, factors including impairment and distraction were primary causes in the 62,000 deaths of young people on European roadways between 2004 and 2013, making it imperative for younger and more inexperienced drivers to not engage in risky behavior.

Startlingly, the Ford-commissioned survey of 6,500 Europeans aged 18-to-24 found that 57% of those polled admitted to speeding, 43% have texted while driving, 36% have taken calls or sending instant messages while operating a motor vehicle, 16% have driven without wearing their seat belts, 13% have driven after drinking alcohol, and 11% have driven while watching videos on their phones.

“Summer is a great time to enjoy the freedom of driving, which is as much a part of being young today as it was for previous generations. But too many young adults are dying in car crashes caused by a combination of inexperience and poor decision making,” said Jim Graham, manager, Ford DSFL.

Because 57% of respondents also said they tend to drive more safely when there are parent, grandparents, or children in the car, Ford created this video called “Blown Ups.” It’s a thing!

Watch: Blown Ups

Investing in the Future: Ford pledges $4.5 billion to electrified vehicle technology