The News Wheel
No Comments

Three Toyota Concept Cars to Bow at Tokyo Moto Show

Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size Text Size Print This Page

Toyota is pretty excited for the upcoming Tokyo Motor Show, which will take place October 29th through November 8th. The Japanese automaker will have quite the display on its home turf, including new models like the 2016 Prius and the upcoming C-HR crossover. But it’ll also be debuting three all-new concepts, each of which display the automaker’s commitment to design, performance, and the environment.

Toyota S-FR Concept

The Toyota S-FR Concept

Toyota S-FR Concept

The first concept is the long-awaited S-FR sports car. When the automaker first registered the trademark, tongues began wagging regarding its possible link to the Toyota Supra successor. However, it’s more likely to be a smaller vehicle that’ll fit under the 86 in Toyota’s lineup (also called the Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ in US markets). This entry-level model will be super lightweight, fun to drive, and affordable. The image released by Toyota Japan brings to mind classic British sports cars like the MG Midget.

Next-Button

Toyota FCV Plus Concept

The Toyota FCV Plus Concept

Toyota FCV Plus Concept

The second concept is the Toyota FCV Plus. Powered by hydrogen, the futuristic vehicle is able to generate electricity for use at home or away, and can also share its power generation capabilities with communities as part of the local infrastructure. The vehicle’s fuel stack is mounted between the front tires, with the hydrogen tank behind the rear seat. It’s built to be lightweight and to have an optimal weight balance and a wide field of vision.

Next-ButtonPrevious-Button

Toyota KIKAI Concept

The Toyota KIKAI Concept

Toyota KIKAI Concept

Finally, Toyota will debut the KIKAI concept. Its old-fashioned yet modern styling is designed to highlight the craftsmanship, beauty, and simplicity of vehicle design. The driver’s seat is in the front center of the vehicle to give a more instinctive sensory connection between the two. Rather than hiding the machinery from sight, Toyota has displayed it for the world to see as a way of celebrating not just the exterior design of the automobile, but the fine craftsmanship of its inner workings.

Previous-ButtonNext-Article-Button