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What To Do If Your Used Car Gets Recalled

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Getting a recall notice on your vehicle may not be good news, but since recall notices range in severity, finding out that a part on your vehicle is defective may not be as bad as you think.

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“Many recalls are for less than perilous reasons. Sometimes they’re for something as benign as a mislabeled sticker. Or durability tests find a suspension spring could wear out prematurely,” according to “Even when a recall is issued, often there’s little likelihood that a part will actually fail. Indeed, a vast majority of affected cars will never experience the potential problems outlined in a recall notice.”

And hopefully, with a new car, your likelihood of receiving a recall will be minimal. But, what if you bought your car used? Buying a used car holds many benefits including cost savings, but it also means you’re taking on a vehicle that might have exiting issues, including a recall.

“If you just picked up a used car, or if you’re in the market for one, you might find some unsettling or downright scary information about existing recalls. Some recalls are for really serious problems, and you shouldn’t delay getting them fixed,” according to Writer Cherise Threewitt.

There is good news if you bought your used car from a manufacturer-affiliated dealership, though.

“If you are buying a used car from a dealership that’s affiliated with the car’s manufacturer, there shouldn’t be any outstanding recalls by the time the car makes it to the lot. If there are, you should ask for the work to be completed before signing the contract and taking delivery of the car,” reports Threewitt.

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If you purchased your vehicle from a used car dealership that isn’t affiliated with the car’s manufacturer, you might not receive recall info before you drive away, according to Threewitt.

If you’re in the market for a used car or are currently driving a used car, do your homework to uncover if the vehicle of your dreams is subject to any recalls.

News Source: How Stuff Works, Consumer Reports