Tim Shults
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“You’re Not Taking That” and “I’m Sorry”: Two New Subaru Ads Promote Safety [VIDEO]

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Subaru safety commercial teen drivers accidents

Subaru has built its identity on being a family-oriented brand that’s concerned with customer safety. Through meticulous craftsmanship and a myriad of driver assistance features, Subaru vehicles have been engineered to protect on the road.

To emphasize its dedication to safety, Subaru has released two new commercials, each very different from the other.

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“Take the Subaru” Commercial

There are a lot of dangerous items around your home, and chances are your child will find them. From chainsaws to florescent lights, everyday objects can pose harm to kids when they’re improperly used. That’s why parents must be vigilant to keep them out of harm’s way. But what about when parent’s aren’t around? According to Subaru, you can trust that vehicles like the 2017 Outback will protect your teens on the road.

This message is humorously illustrated in this montage of children (almost) getting into trouble and being told “You’re not taking that!” by their parents. When one teen tells his mother he’s taking the Subaru, he’s surprised when she actually agrees!

“I’m Sorry” Commercial

This far more serious commercial is also a montage, though this time the teenagers have already gotten into trouble when out of the road. The ad is a collection of scenes and phone calls from car accident scenes (staged, not real) where teenage drivers are calling their parents and apologizing for wrecking the car. Despite the overwhelming distress the young drivers feel, their parents reassure them that their safety is more important than the Subaru.

This commercial speaks to the seriousness and severity of car accidents, especially with teenage drivers who have parents concerned for their safety.

Each of the two commercials have very different approaches to making the same point. Which one do you feel does it better?

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  • HEMSSafety

    I would put the “I’m Sorry” commercial right up there with the Apple “Think Different” commercial by Chiat-Day agency many years ago. I would venture that many, if not most, parents with teenage children have been in this predicament before and received a phone call like this… my wife and I have. I am not in the advertising business but find this commercial brilliant in its simplicity and obviousness.