Zachary Berry
2 Comments

Infographic: Differences Between the 2017 Chevrolet Volt and 2017 Chevrolet Bolt

Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size Text Size Print This Page

The Chevrolet Bolt EV, Chevy’s latest experiment in the realm of electric vehicles, will become available nationwide during the month of August. While the Bolt is certainly one of the most talked about vehicles on the market at the moment, drivers would be remiss not to remember Chevrolet’s iconic hybrid: the Chevrolet Volt. While the names of these vehicles certainly sound the same, the differences between them can be quite striking. Fortunately, the following infographic from The News Wheel describes in detail the differences between the Chevrolet Volt and the Chevrolet Bolt.


Go Green: Infographic: Meet America’s Greenest Cars



Reaching for More Range: Consumer Reports Finds the Chevy Bolt Achieves the Best Electric Range of Any Electric Car


  • Zachary Berry

    Zachary Berry currently resides in the Dayton, Ohio area. However, he enjoys traveling from place to place, as he was born in Oklahoma City and has also lived in Albuquerque and Orlando (such is the life of a military brat). Zachary graduated from Ohio University with a major in Strategic Communication, which is fancy talk for advertising and public relations. Beginning his career at The News Wheel as a lowly intern, he was able to climb his way to the top, eventually claiming his place within the last cubicle on the left. Other jobs that Zachary has held include driving around a safari truck at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. When he’s not putting his nose to the grindstone, Zachary enjoys watching and critiquing movies and television. See more articles by Zachary.

  • ReaganLogan

    BOLT for city life, VOLT for long travels

  • JustMoved315

    The graphic has a huge error. It compares the MPGe of the Bolt to the MPG of the Volt. The Volt’s MPGe for electric only range is similarly right near 100. Either the MPGe of the Volt should be used, or if you’re trying to compare over all conditions of the Volt, including when it’s on gas, then the “blended” MPG figure should be used, rather than the gas-only MPG figure that is used presently.